Initiatives of Change

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Stories of Hope from the Middle East

On 8th May, I attended an inspirational event at the House of Commons hosted by Rt Hon Tom Brake MP and arranged by Creators of Peace and Initiatives of Change, bringing personal insights from grassroots peacemakers from Lebanon and Syria.

The event provided an opportunity to hear from a small group of grassroots peace-makers from Lebanon and Syria who are associated with the international Initiatives of Change movement. They represented two networks which are working for peace through people finding new perspectives and a change of heart.  Continue reading

Britain Palestine Israel – 70 Years On

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Photos of yesterday’s conference organised by King’s College, London & Balfour Project: 1st May 2018. Speakers included Sir Vincent Fean (former British Counsel-General, Jerusalem), Alon Liel (former Director-General, Israeli Foreign Ministry), Ghada Karmi (Palestinian doctor, writer, Research Fellow, Exeter University), Peter Shambrook (British historian specialising in the Middle East), Leila Sansour (Palestinian film maker based in Bethlehem) and Menachem Klein Department of Political Science, Bar-Ilan University, Israel and Visiting Professor, Kings College Middle East Studies Department). View more photos here

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Jerusalem: The Eternal Capital of Faith

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President Donald Trump’s decision to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and move the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, destroyed in the stroke of the pen any lingering illusions of a shared city, the two state solution or an independent sovereign Palestine. Jewish and Christian Zionists regard Jerusalem as the exclusive, undivided and eternal capital of the Jewish state, justifying the annexation, segregation and ethnic cleansing of Palestine.

Following the Arab-Israeli war of 1967 and the capture of Jerusalem, in June 1971, a conference took place in  Jerusalem of over 1,200 evangelical leaders from 32 different countries. Welcomed by David Ben Gurion, the conference was billed as “the first conference of its kind since A.D. 59”. The capture of Jerusalem was portrayed as “confirmation that Jews and Israel still had a role to play in God’s ordering of history” and that the return of Jesus was imminent.[1] Continue reading