Threats to the Arctic: An Interview with Professor Scott Elias

Threats to the Arctic discusses all the current threats to this fragile region, emphasizing the interconnections between many environmental impacts, as well as the teleconnections between events already emerging in the Arctic (ocean circulation changes, melting of sea ice, glaciers and ice sheets) and other parts of the world. The book’s aim is to inform readers about the impending, sometimes irreversible changes coming to the Arctic. University students, environmental engineers, policymakers and sociologists with an interest in the role of the Arctic in global change will benefit from the book’s unique perspective. As this remote, inhospitable part of the world that few people will ever visit provides amazing insights, we can no longer have an ‘out of sight – out of mind’ approach to the environmental upheavals taking place in the Arctic.

Threats to the Arctic provides the most up-to-date information on this rapidly changing, critical part of the world, it offers a holistic understanding of the interconnections between global environmental changes and impacts in the Arctic, examining fact-based pressure on politics and industry to preserve Arctic biota and environments.

Professor Scott Elias received his PhD in environmental biology from the University of Colorado, Colorado, United States, then he went on to do postdoctoral fellowships at the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada and the University of Berne, Switzerland. He became a Professor of Quaternary Science at Royal Holloway, University of London, London in 2007 following the publication of the Encyclopedia of Quaternary Science that same year. He retired from Royal Holloway in 2017 and continues to do research in Quaternary environments, focusing on the Arctic. Dr. Elias has authored or edited 11 books and over 200 journal articles and book chapters.

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